DPRK Sanctions, Evasion, and Diplomacy

Thursday, July 11th –  Partnership for a Secure America (PSA) hosted a lunch briefing on the Hill to discuss the efficacy of sanctions in light of North Korea’s illicit finance networks and economic integration with China, while outlining what opportunities remain for diplomatic engagement between Washington and Pyongyang. Richard Johnson, Senior Director for fuel cycle and […]

Off-the-Record with Michael Morell and Roger Zakheim

Off-the-Record Dinner with General Philip Breedlove

On June 4th, the Partnership for a Secure America held an off-the-record dinner for alumni of the Congressional Partnership Program with General Philip Breedlove to discuss today’s pressing foreign policy challenges and U.S. relations with Europe. Gen. Breedlove served as the Commander of U.S. European Command and Supreme Allied Commander Europe of NATO from 2013-2016.

This was a closed event for alumni of the Congressional Partnership Program.


General Philip Breedlove (U.S. Air Force, Ret.)

 

Phil Breedlove is a proven strategic planner, motivational leader and talented communicator. He is a highly decorated retired general of the United States Air Force where he reached the highest levels of military leadership as one of six geographic Combatant Commanders and the Supreme Allied Commander of NATO.

As the Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR) and the Commander of U.S. European Command, he answered directly to NATO’s governing body, the North Atlantic Council, and to the President of the United States and Secretary of Defense. He led the most comprehensive and strategic structural and policy security changes in the alliance’s 70 year history. He led the forces of 28 nations and multiple partners in ensuring the security of an alliance that accounts for more than half the world’s GDP.

As Commander, U.S. Air Forces Europe and Air Forces Africa, Breedlove was responsible for organizing, training, equipping and maintaining combat-ready forces while ensuring theater air defense forces were ready to meet the challenges of peacetime air sovereignty and wartime defense.

As Vice Chief of Staff of the Air Force, he presided over the Air Staff and served as a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Requirements Oversight Council and Deputy Advisory Working Group during a period of intense challenge, including devising measures to meet the requirements of the the Budget Control Act’s required $480 billion reduction of the Department of Defense budget.

He earned his Bachelor of Civil Engineering degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a Master of Science in Aerospace Technology from Arizona State University. Additionally, he completed a Masters of International Security Affairs from the National War College, a Fellowship in International Security Affairs, Seminar XXI from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and completed Leadership at the Peak at the Center for Creative Leadership Colorado Springs.

Breedlove currently serves on the Georgia Tech Advisory Board, as a Distinguished Professor in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Tech, as a Senior Advisor to Culpeper National Security Solutions, and on the Board of Directors of both the Atlantic Council and the Center for a New American Strategy.

Off-the-Record Dinner with Joan O’Hara

On June 4,  Partnership for a Secure America hosted an off-the-record dinner for participants in the Spring 2018 Congressional Partnership Program with Joan O’Hara, Deputy National Security Advisor to the Vice President. Ms. O’Hara discussed the National Security Strategy, the upcoming summit between the U.S. and North Korea and the role of trade in foreign policy.


Joan O’Hara

Joan O’Hara joined the OVP NSA as Deputy National Security Advisor in February 2017, and served as Acting National Security Advisor from September 2017 through April 2018.

Prior to joining the Administration, Joan served as General Counsel to the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Homeland Security, Majority Staff.  As General Counsel, Joan provided legal advice to the Committee Chairman on national security matters, and played a central role in developing the Committee’s policy positions and legislative agenda. Working closely with House Leadership, Members of Congress, interagency principals, and private sector stakeholders, she shepherded bills through the legislative process from drafting to passage into law.

Before entering law, Joan enjoyed more than a decade of experience as an elite athlete and award-winning NCAA Division I Head Coach in the sport of Rowing.  As a Resident Athlete at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in California, Joan trained with the U.S. Olympic Rowing Team and was United States National Champion in the Single Sculls and Quadruple Sculls.

Joan holds a B.A. from Loyola University, an M.A. from San Diego State University, and a J.D. cum laude from New York Law School. She hails from Long Island, New York.

South Sudan: Congress’ Role in Building a Sustainable Peace

On April 10th, South Sudan experts Ambassador Princeton Lyman and Susan Stigant, of the United States Institute of Peace discussed the current situation in South Sudan and what Congress can do to stop the spread of famine and genocide.

Lauren Ploch-Blanchard of the Congressional Research Service moderated the discussion.

This was a closed, off-the-record event for congressional staff.


Ambassador Princeton Lyman

Ambassador Princeton N. Lyman served as United States special envoy for Sudan and South Sudan from March 2011 to March 2013.  As special envoy he led U.S. policy in helping in the implementation of the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement. Ambassador Lyman previously held the position of Ralph Bunche Fellow for African Affairs at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). He was also an adjunct professor at Georgetown University and at Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Studies. From 1999 to 2003, he was executive director of the Global Interdependence Initiative at the Aspen Institute.

Ambassador Lyman’s previous career in government included assignments as deputy assistant secretary of state for African affairs (1981-1986), U.S. ambassador to Nigeria (1986-1989), director of refugee programs (1989-1992), U.S. ambassador to South Africa (1992-1995), and assistant secretary of state for international organization affairs (1996-1998). From 2008-2010, he was a member of the African Advisory Committee to the United States Trade Representative. He began his government career with the U.S. Agency for International Development and served as USAID director in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, from 1976 to 1978.


Susan Stigant

Susan Stigant is the director of Africa programs in the Middle East & Africa center at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP). Stigant’s focus is on the design and implementation of constitution-making processes in post-conflict and transitional states. She has and continues to advise government officials and civil society actors on issues of constitutional reform in Sudan, South Sudan, Libya, Somalia, and elsewhere. Ms. Stigant also serves as co-chair of USIP’s national dialogue working group, where she coordinates the development of practitioner-focused research and tools to support and evaluate national dialogues as a mechanism for conflict transformation and peacebuilding. Substantively, Stigant’s areas of expertise include constitutional design, civic education and citizen engagement, decentralization and federalism.

Ms. Stigant joined USIP in 2013. Previously, she managed constitutional development and engagement programs in Somalia, Yemen, and South Sudan with the National Democratic Institute (NDI). From 2005-2011, she served as program director with NDI in South Sudan, where she worked with civil society and government officials to support constitutional development, elections, and citizen participation. She also worked with the Forum of Federations on comparative federalism and with the research unit of the Western Cape Provincial Parliament in South Africa. Stigant holds a Master’s degree in comparative politics, negotiation, and conflict management from the University of North Carolina and Duke University.


This was the 37th event in the USIP/PSA Congressional Briefing Series – Topics on International Conflict Resolution and Prevention, and educational program designed to provide congressional staff with opportunities to engage leading experts and fellow Capitol Hill staffers in bipartisan forums. The program aims to build cross-party relationships, encourage bipartisan dialogue, and equip staff with new perspectives on critical issues in the international conflict resolution and prevention field.

Strengthening the IAEA

On March 22nd, Partnership for a Secure America hosted an experts briefing on how the IAEA can enhance its activities in Nuclear Security and Technical Cooperation. Speakers included David Waller, Former Deputy Director General, IAEA and James Casterton, Former Director, International Safeguards Division, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. This off-the-record briefing focused on the findings of a recent report coordinated by PSA and conducted by former ambassadors to and senior officials of the IAEA reflecting their analysis and diverse views of the world’s deadliest materials, future scenarios, and policy recommendations.

Off-The-Record Dinner Discussion on American Foreign Policy and National Security Priorities

On March 20th, Partnership for a Secure America and American Academy of Diplomacy hosted a bipartisan, private dinner to discuss American perspectives on foreign policy and national security priorities today. Ambassadors Robert Beecroft, U.S. Ambassador to Egypt (2014-2017),  Iraq (2012-2014), Jordan (2008-2011); Ronald Neumann, U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan (2005-2007), Bahrain (2001-2004), Algeria (1994-1997); and Tom Pickering, Under Secretary for Political Affairs (1997-2000), U.S. Ambassador to Russia (1993-1996), India (1992-1993), United Nations (1989-1992), Israel (1985-1988), El Salvador (1983-1985), Nigeria (1981-1983), Jordan (1974-1978) joined the dinner discussion. This off-the-record event was a conversation focused on helping the American Academy of Diplomacy’s retired diplomats hear the perspectives of different constituencies as part of a larger effort to assess U.S. voter priorities.

The Jihadi Threat: ISIS, Al Qaeda and Beyond

On March 13th, Partnership for a Secure America, the United States Institute of Peace, and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars hosted an experts briefing on future trends in extremism and policy responses. Panelists included Hassan Hassan, Tahrir Institute for Middle East Policy; Daveed Gartenstein-Ross, Foundation for the Defense of Democracies; and Frederic Wehrey, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. This off-the-record briefing focused on the findings of a recent report dissecting the world’s deadliest movements, their strategies, future scenarios and policy considerations.

USIP: A National Security Resource For Congress

On February 8th, Ambassador Bill Taylor, Executive Vice President of the U.S. Institute of Peace and former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine discussed the foreign policy and national security challenges facing the United States in 2017. He highlighted the key foreign policy take-aways from USIP’s Passing the Baton Conference that reviewed the global challenges confronting the U.S during the transition period between outgoing and incoming administrations.


Ambassador Bill Taylor

Ambassador William B. Taylor is the executive vice president at the U.S. Institute of Peace.  Earlier, he was the special coordinator for Middle East Transitions in the U.S. State Department.  He oversaw assistance and support to Egypt, Tunisia, Libya and Syria.  He served as the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine from 2006 to 2009.

He also served as the U.S. government’s representative to the Mideast Quartet, which facilitated the Israeli disengagement from Gaza and parts of the West Bank.  He served in Baghdad as the first director of the Iraq Reconstruction Management Office from 2004 to 2005, and in Kabul as coordinator of international and U.S. assistance to Afghanistan from 2002 to 2003.  Ambassador Taylor was also coordinator of U.S. assistance to the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. He earlier served on the staff of Senator Bill Bradley.

He is a graduate of West Point and Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and served as an infantry platoon leader and combat company commander in the U.S. Army in Vietnam and Germany.

He is married with two adult children.


This was the 36th event in the USIP-PSA Congressional Briefing Series – Topics on International Conflict Resolution and Prevention, and educational program designed to provide congressional staff with opportunities to engage leading experts and fellow Capitol Hill staffers in bipartisan forums. The program aims to build cross-party relationships, encourage bipartisan dialogue, and equip staff with new perspectives on critical issues in the international conflict resolution and prevention field.

Off-the-Record Discussion with Sec. Madeleine Albright

On December 13th,  Madeleine Albright, former Secretary of State, met with alumni of the Congressional Partnership Program for an off-the-record dinner, where she discussed today’s foreign policy and national security issues.

 

This was a closed event for alumni of the Congressional Partnership Program.

 


Secretary Madeleine Albright

Madeleine Albright

Madeleine K. Albright is Chair of Albright Stonebridge Group, a global strategy firm, and Chair of Albright Capital Management LLC, an investment advisory firm focused on emerging markets. Dr. Albright was the 64th Secretary of State of the United States.

In 1997, she was named the first female Secretary of State and became, at that time, the highest ranking woman in the history of the U.S. government. As Secretary of State, Dr. Albright reinforced America’s alliances, advocated for democracy and human rights, and promoted American trade, business, labor, and environmental standards abroad. From 1993 to 1997, Dr. Albright served as the U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations and was a member of the President’s Cabinet. From 1989 to 1992, she served as President of the Center for National Policy. Previously, she was a member of President Jimmy Carter’s National Security Council and White House staff and served as Chief Legislative Assistant to U.S. Senator Edmund S. Muskie.

Dr. Albright is a Professor in the Practice of Diplomacy at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service. She chairs both the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs and the Pew Global Attitudes Project and serves as president of the Truman Scholarship Foundation. Dr. Albright serves on the Boards of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Aspen Institute and the Center for a New American Security. In 2009, Dr. Albright was asked by NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen to Chair a Group of Experts focused on developing NATO’s New Strategic Concept.

Dr. Albright is the author of four New York Times bestsellers: her autobiography, Madam Secretary: A Memoir, (2003); The Mighty and the Almighty: Reflections on America, God, and World Affairs (2006); Memo to the President: How We Can Restore America’s Reputation and Leadership (2008); and Read My Pins: Stories from a Diplomat’s Jewel Box (2009).

Dr. Albright received a B.A. with Honors from Wellesley College, and Master’s and Doctorate degrees from Columbia University’s Department of Public Law and Government, as well as a Certificate from its Russian Institute.

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