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Off-the-Record Dinner with Jeh Johnson

On July 25th, the Partnership for a Secure America held an off-the-record dinner for alumni of the Congressional Partnership Program with Jeh Johnson to discuss today’s pressing foreign policy and national security challenges. In addition to leading the Department of Homeland Security from December 2013 to January 2017, Johnson served as General Counsel of the U.S. Department of Defense and General Counsel of the U.S. Air Force.

This was a closed event for alumni of the Congressional Partnership Program.

This event was made possible by the generous support of Intel and the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

 


Jeh Johnson

Jeh Johnson, the former Secretary of Homeland Security, is a partner in the Paul, Weiss Litigation Department and a member of the Firm’s Management Committee. Secretary Johnson advises clients, including management teams and boards of directors, on crisis management, government and internal investigations, high-stakes litigation and regulatory matters, and legal aspects of cybersecurity and other security matters. He is also an experienced trial lawyer, and a Fellow in the American College of Trial Lawyers. Secretary Johnson is on the board of directors of Lockheed Martin. He is resident in both the New York and Washington offices of Paul, Weiss. Since leaving government in January 2017, Secretary Johnson has been called upon to testify before Congress in cybersecurity matters three times, and is a regular commentator on national and homeland security on ABC, CBS, NBC, MSNBC, CNN and numerous other outlets.

Off-the-Record Discussion with Amb. Tony Wayne

On November 13th, Partnership for a Secure America held an off-the-record dinner for participants in the Fall 2017 Congressional Partnership Program with former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico, Tony Wayne. Ambassador Wayne discussed U.S.-Mexico relations and NAFTA.

 


Ambassador Tony Wayne

Wayne Earl-AnthonyEarl Anthony Wayne, or “Tony”, as he is known, was confirmed by the U.S. Senate in 2010 as a Career Ambassador.  He has held a variety of diplomatic and policy positions In Washington and U.S. embassies.

From 2011 through July 2015, Wayne served as the U.S. Ambassador to Mexico.  During his tenure, Mission Mexico helped establish the US-Mexico High Level Economic Dialogue, the Mexico-US Entrepreneurship and Innovation Council, and new energy and environmental dialogues, while in trade, investment, and tourism grew.  Through the Merida Initiative and bilateral coordination efforts, law enforcement, security, defense, border and consular cooperation improved; and military-to-military cooperation reached new levels.  Wayne received Mexico’s Order of the Aztec Eagle and the State Department’s Cobb Award for Initiative and Success in Trade Development.

From 2009 to 2011, Wayne served in Kabul, Afghanistan, as Coordinating Director for Development and Economic Affairs and then as Deputy U.S. Ambassador.  Wayne received a Presidential Meritorious Service Award, a Secretary of Defense Medal for Meritorious Civilian Service, and the State Department’s Cordell Hull Award for Economic Achievement.  From 2006 to 2009, Wayne served as the U.S. Ambassador to Argentina, where he promoted U.S. commercial interests, improved the U.S. image in the face of strong anti-Americanism, and strengthened cooperation against terrorism and human and drug trafficking.  He received the Paul Wellstone Anti-Slavery Ambassador of the Year Award.

From 2000-2006, Wayne worked for three Secretaries of State as Assistant Secretary of State for Economic and Business Affairs (EB).  EB played a lead role in organizing major international donor and reconstruction conferences.  Wayne and his team built international coalitions to block money flow to terrorists, and collaborated to place terrorists and their financiers under UN and U.S. sanctions. His team helped steer negotiations of debt relief and economic reform and supported U.S. companies in commercial disputes.  The longest serving EB Assistant Secretary, he received a State Department Distinguished Honor Award and a Presidential Meritorious Service Award.  From 1996-2000, Wayne served as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs and as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Europe and Canada.  He promoted relations with the European Union and OECD.  He played a key role in building G8 consensus on the situation surrounding Kosovo and in organizing the 1999 Stability Pact Summit in Sarajevo, for which he received a Presidential Distinguished Service Award.

Wayne has an MPA from the JFK School of Government, Harvard University, an MA from Princeton University, an MA from Stanford University, and a BA is from the University of California, Berkeley.

CPP Fall 2017 Retreat

On October 21st and 22nd, participants in the Fall 2017 class of the Congressional Partnership Program joined foreign policy and national security experts for a weekend of thought provoking discussions and bipartisan team-building. This retreat was a great opportunity for participants to assess global challenges, explore differences, and build common ground.


Bipartisan Forum

Participants heard from Mr. Luke Murry and Mr. Michael Kuiken on the mechanics of bipartisan consensus on the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act. Speakers discussed their negotiation of the bill language and passage through both chambers of Congress.

Featuring: 

Mr. Luke Murry – National Security Advisor for House Majority Leader, Congressman Kevin McCarthy

Mr. Michael Kuiken – National Security Advisor for Senate Minority Leader, Senator Chuck Schumer

 


Keynote Address

The Keynote address was provided by Mr. Michael Morell who discussed “Global Challenges for Today and Tomorrow.” Mr. Morell discussed global instability, challenges facing the intelligence community, and opportunities for Congressional engagement.

Featuring:

Mr. Michael Morell – Former Deputy Director of the CIA and Former Acting Director of the CIA.

 


Breakout Sessions

Ambassador Roger Noreiga discussed the Venezuelan crisis including high inflation and unemployment, a rise in violence, and crushing debt. Ambassador Noriega also addressed U.S. policy options when dealing with Venezuela.

Ambassador Barbara Bodine discussed Yemen and the Arabian Peninsula. She outlined the various countries vying for influence in Yemen, how the war affects the Arabian Peninsula, and strategies the U.S. should employ to help bring the war to an end.

Featuring:

Ambassador Roger Noreiga – Former Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs and Former U.S. Ambassador to the Organization of American States

Ambassador Barbara Bodine – Former U.S. Ambassador to Yemen.


National Security Council Simulation

Participants engaged in a National Security Council Simulation led by Mr. Robert Sheldon to advance strategic negotiation and communication skills.

Featuring: 

Mr. Robert Sheldon – Director for Policy – Emerging Threats at the Business Executives for National Security.

USIP-PSA Celebrate 35th Event of Briefing Series

On November 3rd, The United States Institute of Peace (USIP) and Partnership for a Secure America (PSA) celebrated the 35th event in the Congressional Briefing Series – Topics on International Conflict Resolution and Prevention. This series is an educational program that is designed to provide congressional staff with opportunities to engage leading experts and fellow Capitol Hill staffers in bipartisan forums.

This series has been very successful in providing an opportunity for staff to receive fact-based updates on conflict around the world and discuss opportunities for bipartisan consensus. It has featured events on conflict resolution in countries including Afghanistan, Colombia, Iraq, Ukraine, Syria, Tunisia, and Pakistan. The series has also focused on how to prevent conflict by hosting briefings on issues including countering violent extremism in Africa and civil nonviolent resistance.

Notable speakers include General John Allen, Ambassador Bill Taylor, Congressman Jim Kolbe, Dr. Andrew Wilder, and Ambassador Thomas Pickering. Over the lifetime of the program, this briefing series has hosted hundreds of congressional foreign policy and national security staffers.

 

Colombia: What’s Next For the Peace Agenda

On October 13th, Amb. Roger Noriega, former U.S. Ambassador to the Organization of American States & Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere, discussed recent developments in Colombia, including the fallout of the peace deal referendum in Colombia and the future of the peace negotiations between the Colombian Government and FARC leaders. June Beittel from the Congressional Research Service moderated the discussion.

This event was the first in a three-part series on foreign policy during this political transition. The following two events will focus on Afghanistan and Iraq.


Ambassador Roger Noriega

Roger NoriegaAmbassador Noriega was the Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs from 2003 to 2005, where he was responsible for managing U.S. foreign policy and promoting U.S. interests in the region. Prior to becoming Assistant Secretary, Ambassador Noriega served as U.S. Permanent Representative to the Organization of American States from 2001 to 2003. While at the OAS, he worked with hemispheric leaders to strengthen democracy, advance human rights, foster economic integration and promote peace and security throughout the Western Hemisphere. Before his appointment to the OAS, Ambassador Noriega was a senior staff member for the Committee on Foreign Relations of the U.S. Senate. From 1994 to 1997 he was a senior staff member for the Committee on International Relations of the U.S. House of Representatives.


June Beittel

June S. Beittel is an Analyst in Latin American Affairs with the Foreign Affairs, Defense, and Trade Division of the Congressional Research Service, U.S. Library of Congress.  Her work concentrates on U.S. relations with Colombia, Ecuador, and Paraguay and she covers drug trafficking and organized crime in Mexico, climate change and clean energy, and other political and economic issues in the region. Previously she directed outreach programs at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs and developed programs for local officials in the United States, on the U.S.-Mexico border, and in other countries during her tenure as a project manager for the International City/County Management Association. She holds a BA in American Studies from the University of California at Santa Cruz, and an MA from Colombia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. She was a Public Affairs Fellow with the Coro Foundation in San Francisco, California.


This was the 33rd event in the USIP/PSA Congressional Briefing Series – Topics on International Conflict Resolution and Prevention, an educational program designed to provide congressional staff with opportunities to engage leading experts and fellow Capitol Hill staffers in bipartisan forums. The program aims to build cross-party relationships, encourage bipartisan dialogue, and equip staff with new perspectives on critical issues in international conflict, resolution and prevention.

Colombia & Its Neighbors: Between Peace and Chaos

On July 20, Ambassador Roger Noriega, Former Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs (2003-2005), and Virginia Bouvier, Senior Advisor for Peace Proccesses at USIP,  discussed the current state of affairs in South America. Ambassador Noreiga and Ms. Bouvier described recent advances in the Colombian peace process, the situation in Venezuela, the political and health issues in Brazil, and other issues facing South America.

This is an off-the-record discussion for Congressional Staff.

 

 


 

Ambassador Roger Noriega

Roger NoriegaAmbassador Noriega was the Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs from 2003 to 2005, where he was responsible for managing U.S. foreign policy and promoting U.S. interests in the region. Prior to becoming Assistant Secretary, Ambassador Noriega served as U.S. Permanent Representative to the Organization of American States from 2001 to 2003. While at the OAS, he worked with hemispheric leaders to strengthen democracy, advance human rights, foster economic integration and promote peace and security throughout the Western Hemisphere. Before his appointment to the OAS, Ambassador Noriega was a senior staff member for the Committee on Foreign Relations of the U.S. Senate. From 1994 to 1997 he was a senior staff member for the Committee on International Relations of the U.S. House of Representatives.

 


Virginia Bouvier

Virginia BouvierVirginia Bouvier  is senior advisor for Peace Processes. She joined USIP in January 2003 and has headed USIP’s Colombia team since 2006. She was seconded in 2012-13 to serve as a process design expert for the United Nations Standby Team of Mediation Experts. For the previous seven years, she was an assistant professor of Latin American literature and culture at the University of Maryland. From 1982 to 1989, Bouvier served as senior associate at the Washington Office on Latin America, where she focused on Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay. Bouvier has also served as a consultant and research director for the Women’s Leadership Conference of the Americas, a joint project of the Inter-American Dialogue and the International Center for Research on Women, and as a consultant for USAID, UN-Women, and World Bank. Her areas of expertise include Colombia, mediation and peace processes, conflict analysis and prevention, civil society, and gender and peacebuilding.

 


 

This was the 31st event in the USIP/PSA Congressional Briefing Series – Topics on International Conflict Resolution and Prevention, an educational program designed to provide congressional staff with opportunities to engage leading experts and fellow Capitol Hill staffers in bipartisan forums. The program aims to build cross-party relationships, encourage bipartisan dialogue, and equip staff with new perspectives on critical issues in international conflict, resolution and prevention.

The United States-Mexico Security Relationship

PUBLIC EVENT:

Two participants in Partnership for a Secure America’s Congressional Partnership Program hosted a discussion with Professor John Bailey, Georgetown University, Department of Government and School of Foreign Service Director, Mexico Project and Iñigo Guevara, Mexican writer and analyst specializing in Latin American defense and security issues; former adviser to Mexico’s Office of the National Security Council. The subject of the briefing was developments in the U.S.-Mexico security relationship since the election of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto.

This event was held on Monday, September 30th.


Professor John Bailey

Prof. Bailey has taught at Georgetown University since 1970. Following study and fieldwork in Peru and Colombia, his research since the late 1970s focused largely on Mexico. His sabbatical leaves in Mexico include the Instituto Nacional de Administracion Publica (1979), El Colegio de Mexico (1985), and the Universidad de Nuevo Leon (Monterrey; 1991). He has published articles and book chapters on a variety of policy issues in Mexican politics, including agriculture, public budgeting, decentralization, education, electoral reform, government-business relations and social security. During 1980-90 he directed the Mexico Seminar at the U.S. Department of State’s Foreign Service Institute. Most recently he has concentrated on issues of national and public security in the bilateral relationship and in the Western Hemisphere more broadly. He is currently completing a book about “security traps” and democratic governance. Professor Bailey has chaired the Government Department (1987-90) and directed the Latin American Studies Program (1972-74; 1994-96). He received an “Honored Faculty” award from the School of Foreign Service in 2002 for excellence in teaching.


 

Mr. Iñigo Guevara Moyano

Mr. Moyano is a Mexican writer and analyst specializing in Latin American defense and security issues. He is a former advisor to Mexico’s Office of the National Security Council and a former head of statistical analysis at a State-level law enforcement agency in Mexico. Mr. Moyano is a member of the Collective for the Analysis of Security for Democracy (CASEDE), the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), and the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), where he contributes to the Military Expenditure and Arms Transfer projects. In Washington, DC, he has lectured at the Brookings Institution, Georgetown University, the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), the State Department’s Foreign Service Institute (FSI), Council of the America’s (COA), Industrial College of the Armed Forces (ICAF), and Committee on Hemispheric Security of the Organization of American States (OAS). Mr. Moyano’s focus is on armed forces’ policy, structure, and the procurement of equipment, infrastructure, and technology. Mr. Moyano is the author of Latin American Fighters (HARPIA, 2009), a history of jet fighters and armed jet trainers in service with Latin American air arms since 1947, and has published over 50 articles in academic journals and specialized magazines. Mr. Moyano holds a Certification in Administration of Public Security from the Instituto de Administracion Publica de Queretaro (IAPQ), a bachelor’s degree in international trade (LIN 00) from the Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM) in Mexico, a master’s degree in international security from Georgetown University, and completed the Strategy and Defense Policy course presented by the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) at National Defense University.


 

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