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The Worldview Series: Japan

Partnership for a Secure America is excited to announce a new partnership with the Embassy of Japan titled The Worldview Series: Japan. This is the third installment of PSA’s program, The Worldview Series. The Embassy of Japan and PSA have designed this unique educational program to improve congressional insight into Japan and better inform U.S. foreign policy decisions on Capitol Hill.

This series features off-the-record events with leading Japan experts from government, think tanks, business, and academic arenas and culminates in a delegation to Japan. Focusing on a holistic understanding of Japan’s economic, security, and domestic situation, this program aims to build a deeper understanding of the important decisions American policy-makers face regarding U.S.-Japan Relations.

The Embassy of Japan is an educational participant in the Mutual Education and Cultural Exchange Act, authorized by the U.S. Department of State.


Governmental and Domestic Issues

October 22nd – Joshua Walker and Mark Manyin discussed Japan’s governmental and domestic issues, including a history of the U.S.-Japan relationship, key inflection points in that relationship, and possibilities for working together in the future.

Featuring:

Joshua Walker – Non-Resident and Transatlantic Fellow at the German Marshall Fund

Mark Manyin – Asia Specialist at Congressional Research Service


Economy and Trade

October 29 – Shihoko Goto discussed the foundation of Japan’s economy, the U.S.-Japan trade relationship, and the future of TPP and trade in the Asia-Pacific.

Featuring:

Shihoko Goto – Senior Northeast Asia Associate at the Wilson Center


Japanese Defense and Security in the Region

November 14 – Dr. Sheila Smith discussed Japan’s security and U.S.-Japan Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security. She also addressed regional security issues including the rise of China and relations with the Korean peninsula.

Featuring:

Dr. Sheila Smith – Senior Fellow for Japan Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations


Delegation to Japan

November 18-24 – The Worldview Series flew to Japan for a week-long delegation trip to gain an on-the-ground look at issues influencing U.S.-Japan relations. The delegation visited Tokyo, Hiroshima, and Kyoto and met with Japanese government and defense officials, U.S. military forces stationed in Japan, business representatives, and others.

Off-the-Record Dinner with Joan O’Hara

On June 4,  Partnership for a Secure America hosted an off-the-record dinner for participants in the Spring 2018 Congressional Partnership Program with Joan O’Hara, Deputy National Security Advisor to the Vice President. Ms. O’Hara discussed the National Security Strategy, the upcoming summit between the U.S. and North Korea and the role of trade in foreign policy.


Joan O’Hara

Joan O’Hara joined the OVP NSA as Deputy National Security Advisor in February 2017, and served as Acting National Security Advisor from September 2017 through April 2018.

Prior to joining the Administration, Joan served as General Counsel to the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Homeland Security, Majority Staff.  As General Counsel, Joan provided legal advice to the Committee Chairman on national security matters, and played a central role in developing the Committee’s policy positions and legislative agenda. Working closely with House Leadership, Members of Congress, interagency principals, and private sector stakeholders, she shepherded bills through the legislative process from drafting to passage into law.

Before entering law, Joan enjoyed more than a decade of experience as an elite athlete and award-winning NCAA Division I Head Coach in the sport of Rowing.  As a Resident Athlete at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in California, Joan trained with the U.S. Olympic Rowing Team and was United States National Champion in the Single Sculls and Quadruple Sculls.

Joan holds a B.A. from Loyola University, an M.A. from San Diego State University, and a J.D. cum laude from New York Law School. She hails from Long Island, New York.

Renewed Prospects for Peace on the Korean Peninsula?

On May 22, the United States Institute of Peace’s Senior Expert on North Korea, Frank Aum and the Senior Research Fellow on Northeast Asia at The Heritage Foundation, Bruce Klingner discussed the available options for President Trump at a US-North Korea Summit

CPP Spring 2018 Retreat

On May 12th and 13th, participants in the Spring 2018 class of the Congressional Partnership Program joined foreign policy and national security experts for a weekend of thought provoking discussions and bipartisan team-building. This retreat was a great opportunity for participants to assess global challenges, explore differences, and build common ground.


Negotiation Forum

Participants heard from Ambassador Robert Gallucci who discussed his experience negotiating with the North Korean regime. Amb. Gallucci was the chief U.S. negotiator during the North Korean crisis in 1994, and he described his experience preparing for and negotiating with the North Koreans.

Featuring:

Ambassador Robert Gallucci – Former Ambassador-at-Large and Special Envoy for the U.S. Department of State


Keynote Address

The keynote address was provided by Ambassador Ryan Crocker who discussed global foreign policy challenges. Amb. Crocker explored challenges in the Middle East, opportunities to learn from history, and possibilities for congressional engagement.

Featuring:

Ambassador Ryan Crocker – Former U.S. Ambassador: Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Syria, Kuwait, and Lebanon


Breakout Sessions

Ms. Bonnie Glaser discussed the future of US-China Relations. Her remarks covered Chinese military expansion, Chinese investment in Latin America and Africa, and opportunities for the U.S. and China to work together on efforts such as counterterrorism and combating climate change.

Ms. Melinda Haring and Mr. Tom Carothers examined U.S. efforts to promote democracy abroad. The outlined success stories, opportunities for improvement, and potential models to explore when considering future efforts.

Featuring: 

Ms. Bonnie Glaser – Senior Advisor for Asia, CSIS

Ms. Melinda Haring – Editor of the UkraineAlert Blog at the Atlantic Council and Fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute

Mr. Thomas Carothers – Senior Vice Preidesnt for Studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

 


National Security Council Simulation

Participants engaged in a National Security Council Simulation led by Mr. Robert Sheldon to advance strategic negotiation and communication skills.

Featuring:

Mr. Robert Sheldon – Director of Government Technology Strategy at CrowdStrike

Solutions Series Roundtable: The Rohingya Crisis

On Monday, January 29th, Partnership for a Secure America held an off-the-record roundtable dinner for alumni of the Congressional Partnership program to discuss the growing humanitarian crisis in Burma through targeted violence and rape against the Rohingya Muslim minority group. The conversation focused on how the U.S. and Congress can respond to help end the crisis without damaging recent political and economic progress in Burma.


The Rohingya Crisis

Beginning in August 2017, the Burmese government launched widespread and brutal military operations against the Rohingya, a Muslim minority in the country. The operations, which Burma cited as a counter-terrorist response to attacks by Rohingya militants on military and police stations, have created a humanitarian crisis of epic proportions. Murder, rape, and arson by Burmese military units in conjunction with nationalist Buddhist civilian mobs have forced hundreds of thousands of Rohingya to flee to neighboring Bangladesh, overwhelming refugee resources there.

Key Details

1982 Citizenship Law

  • Under this law, Burma denies citizenship to the Rohingya Muslims, making them one of the largest stateless populations worldwide. The government views them as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.

Relevant Incidents

  • August 2017
    • Rohingya militants from the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) target more than 30 military and police posts, prompting retaliatory operations by Burmese military units and Buddhist civilian vigilantes.
  • September 2017
    • The Burmese government claims that operations against militants ended, contrary to evidence that the military operations continued after this date.
  • November 2017
    • Sec. State Rex Tillerson labels the crisis in Burma “ethnic cleansing.”
    • Bangladesh and Burma sign a deal to return all Rohingya Muslims back to Burma.
  • December 2017
    • The US individually sanctions Burmese general Maung Maung Soe for his role in the military operations.
  • January 2018
    • Bangladesh and Burma finalize details for a repatriation plan and timeframe for the Rohingya refugees. Burma agrees to accept 1,500 Rohingya each week, for a total of 2 years to repatriate all Rohingya.
    • The repatriation of Rohingya Muslims back to Burma is postponed due to fears by refugees that they would be forced to return against their will. The process was slated to begin on January 23, 2018.
    • US diplomat Bill Richardson resigns from an international panel set up by Burmese leader Aung San Suu Kyi to provide advice on the Rohingya crisis, citing a lack of moral leadership by Ms. Suu Kyi.

Prospects for Peace on the Korean Peninsula: U.S. and China

On October 16th, United States Institute of Peace Director for China Programs, Jennifer Staats and former Deputy Commander, US Forces Korea, Lt. General (Ret.) Jan-Marc Jouas discussed options to address the North Korean crisis and ideas for potential areas of cooperation or coordination between the U.S. and China.

The Worldview Series: Japan

 

Partnership for a Secure America is excited to announce a new partnership with the Embassy of Japan titled The Worldview Series: Japan. This is the second installment of PSA’s program, The Worldview Series. The Embassy of Japan and PSA have designed this unique educational program to improve congressional insight into Japan and better inform U.S. foreign policy decisions on Capitol Hill.

This series features off-the-record events with leading Japan experts from government, think tanks, business, and academic arenas and culminates in a delegation to Japan. Focusing on a holistic understanding of Japan’s economic, security, and domestic situation, this program aims to build a deeper understanding of the important decisions American policy-makers face regarding U.S.-Japan Relations.

The Embassy of Japan is an educational participant in the Mutual Education and Cultural Exchange Act, authorized by the U.S. Department of State.


Governmental and Domestic Issues

June 13th – Ambassador James Zumwalt and Director Joseph Young discussed Japan’s governmental and domestic issues, including a history of the U.S.-Japan relationship, key inflection points in that relationship, and possibilities for working together in the future.

Featuring:

Ambassador James Zumwalt – Former Ambassador to the Republic of Senegal and the Republic of Guinea Bissau, Former Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of East Asia Affairs

Director Joseph Young – Director, Office of Japanese Affairs at the U.S. Department of State


Economy and Trade

June 27th – Ambassador Ira Shapiro and Mr. Clyde Prestowitz discussed the foundation of Japan’s economy, the U.S.-Japan trade relationship, and the future of TPP and trade in the Asia-Pacific.

Featuring:

Ambassador Ira Shaprio – Former Chief U.S. Trade Negotiator with Japan and Canada and General Counsel in the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative

Mr. Clyde Prestowitz – Former Counselor to the Secretary of Commerce in the Reagan Administration and Vice Chairman of President Clinton’s Commission on Trade and Investment in the Asia-Pacific Region


Japanese Defense and Security in the Region

July 18th – Dr. Sheila Smith and Dr. Joshua Walker discussed Japan’s security and U.S.-Japan Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security. They also addressed regional security issues including the rise of China and relations with the Korean peninsula.

Featuring:

Dr. Sheila Smith – Senior Fellow for Japan Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations

Dr. Joshua Walker – Former Senior Advisor in Secretary John Kerry’s Office of Chief Economist and Former Senior Advisor to Secretary Hillary Clinton’s Global Partnership Initiative


Delegation to Japan

August 19th-26th – The Worldview Series flew to Japan for a week-long delegation trip to gain an on-the-ground look at issues influencing U.S.-Japan relations. The delegation visited Tokyo, Hiroshima, and Kyoto and met with Japanese government and defense officials, U.S. military forces stationed in Japan, business representatives, and others.

Why Korean Reunification is in China’s Strategic National Interest

Yanbian University, Yanji, China – Jamie Metzl, Vice Chair of the Board of Directors for Partnership for a Secure America (PSA), spoke at the Chinese Summit Forum on Korean Peninsula Studies. Metzl made a strong case for why it is in China’s national interest to rein in North Korea’s nuclear ambitions and, ultimately, to support the reunification of the Korean peninsula under South Korean law. 

North Korea in 2017

The Kim regime has continued to oppress its own citizens in North Korea, with a UN Commission of Inquiry calling its program of suppression a “crime against humanity.”North Korea remains closed off from the world, new ideas, and new opportunities, and continues to threaten its neighbors; occasionally launching unprovoked attacks. Recently North Korea’s rapidly developing nuclear and missile programs grabbed global attention with the successful launch of an ICBM on July 4th. As North Korea’s nuclear weapons program continues its race toward full, deliverable weaponization, it continues to sow regional instability and threatens to ignite an arms race in Asia.

The Perspective of the Kim Regime

The Kim regime views nuclear weaponization as beneficial to their prestige, leverage, and the stability of its leadership. North Korea is racing to develop deliverable nuclear weapons capability in order to prevent the type of foreign intervention experienced by Libya and Ukraine. The hyper-paranoid leadership of North Korea feels safer with nuclear weapons than without them, and has a long history of non-compliance with arms reduction agreements. The only way North Korea will give up its nuclear weapons is if its leaders come to believe the cost of maintaining nuclear weapons is greater than the cost of giving them up.

China’s Relationship with North Korea

China and North Korea have a historic and strategic relationship; the Kim regime provides China with a buffer between itself and US-allied South Korea, as well as a source of cheap resources and labor. China helps to keep the North Korean economy afloat by providing energy, access to trade, and financial services – without Chinese intervention the North Korean state would never have existed, and would crumble quickly. Despite its reliance on Beijing’s support North Korea is becoming increasingly hostile to China, and North Korea’s actions justify our military presence in the region. Chinese leaders are faced with a binary choice; to continue their current path of expressing displeasure without applying sufficient pressure, or to do what it takes to force the North Korean leadership to either give up their nuclear weapons or face regime destabilization and collapse. 


Jamie Metzl serves as vice-chair of Partnership for a Secure America’s Board of Directors. Mr. Metzl is also a senior fellow of the Atlantic Council, and has served on the U.S. National Security Council, State Department and Senate Foreign Relations Committee and with the United Nations in Cambodia. 

Madeleine Albright at Bipartisan National Security Forum

Washington, DC – Partnership for a Secure America (PSA) Advisory Board member and former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright discussed the role of the United States in the world today with Senator Chris Coons (D-DE) at the Capitol Hill National Security Forum. Albright discussed bipartisanship, the role of the United States in the world, China, and Russia and NATO.

Albright on Bipartisanship

Madeleine Albright began by emphasizing the importance of bipartisanship in resolving national security threats. She explained that bipartisanship is essential for success, calling it the “hallmark of American foreign policy.” On this point, she acknowledged the important role of congressional staffers in advancing bipartisan solutions. Most of all, Albright recommended staffers form relationships and travel on delegation trips with other staffers in order to advance bipartisan solutions. She pointed towards her own friendship with Senator Jesse Helms, which allowed her to produce agreements on foreign policy. Albright finished her remarks by stating that bipartisan solutions would “make the Senate great again.”

America’s Role in the World

Albright promoted the need for a rule-based world order as it prevents the world from devolving into chaos. She explained the consistent involvement of the United States in creating these rules, but she warned that not following through with our self-created rules can weaken our position and image in the international community. When questioned on the topic of advancing human rights in the world, Albright responded, “Why should we worry about people in far away places?…Because our way of life depends on what happens in these other countries,” expressing the necessity of human rights in global peace and security.

China

Secretary Albright emphasized the dangers of not following internationally-accepted rules by pointing towards China, whose actions in the South China Sea are eroding the rule-based world order. China’s island-building, which was deemed illegal, has created more instability in the region. She highlighted that the instability caused by China’s actions supports the need for a rule-based order throughout the world.

Russia and NATO

On the topic of Russia, Albright reaffirmed the importance of NATO as leverage against Russia. With the rising threat that Russia poses to liberal alliances and institutions, Albright underscored that NATO is necessary for defending against armed attacks, but also for advancing the common goals of liberal democracies. She pointed towards Ukraine and Georgia,  which have gained confidence in promoting the goals and values of liberal democracies simply by being affiliated with NATO, despite lacking membership.

Solutions Series Roundtable: North Korea

On Thursday, June 22nd Partnership for a Secure America held an off-the-record roundtable dinner for alumni of the Congressional Partnership Program to discuss the growing North Korea crisis. The discussion focused on the current state of legislative activity seeking to address the crisis, and potential opportunities for collaboration on new approaches.


Issue Background

 

2017 has seen the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) test 24 individual ballistic missiles, including short range, medium range, and submarine launched varieties. This is a continuation of the pattern of aggressive missile testing commenced by Kim Jong-un in 2012. DPRK has conducted 6 nuclear test detonations since 2006; the most recent test (held in September 2017) demonstrated a yield of over 140 kilotons, and is generally agreed to confirm DPRK’s development of thermonuclear capabilities. Current projections indicate that US military assets in Guam, Japan, and the Republic of Korea (ROK) are within striking distance of DPRK’s missiles, as well as Tokyo and Seoul – which together contain some 23 million citizens. In the months following this event, North Korea has performed several successful missile tests which place American cities from Los Angeles to Chicago within reach of their nuclear weapons.